Shifting public policy to achieve a sustainable economy, a healthy environment and a just society.


 

Lesson Plans

Redefining Progress, in partnership with Earth Day Network, has developed single-day environmental education lesson plans for K-12 educators. The lesson plans are designed to integrate easily into science, social studies, math, and/or economics curricula.


Food and You

Designed to incorporate environmental education into general math and science classes for elementary school students (K-5th grade), this lesson encourages students to think about where their food comes from, the food production process, and the byproducts associated with their favorite foods.

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The Trash We Pass

This lesson brings environmental education to middle school (4–7th grade) social studies, math, and science classes by asking students to have fun analyzing garbage and recycling options.

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For Educators


Have and Have-Not

This lesson incorporates environmental education in middle school (7–9th grade) social studies, geography, math, and economics classes by helping students gain a perspective on different consumption habits in developing and developed countries, and the effect that mass consumption has on the ecological footprint of a country and an individual.

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Sustainable Dining

Designed for lower high school (7–10th grade) economics, home economics, and general education classes, this lesson teaches students about sustainably produced groceries as a valuable and environmentally friendly option for grocery shopping.

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Renewable Energy

In this lesson targeting high school history, science, and math classes, students will analyze the use of energy in their every day lives, and consider the advantages and disadvantages of environmentally friendly renewable energy sources.

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Kid’s Footprint

For more lesson plans, please visit www.kidsfootprint.org, our adaptation of the Ecological Footprint Quiz for elementary and middle-school students.

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Photo courtesy of J.C. Rojas